birds and books

I'm Monica, a writer living in San Francisco.


HUMAN
HUMAN
DO SOMETHING
FOR GODS SAKE HELP
HUMAN

HUMAN

DO SOMETHING

FOR GODS SAKE HELP

(Source: chichiwho, via vaguelyimaginary)

— 7 hours ago with 410564 notes
phenobarbidol asked: Hi Max, I need a bit of help. I have this character, and all he wants is to have an easy life - I've tried putting him into several different plot situations in my novel attempts, and none of them are right, because he's not interested. However, I need a plot for my story. I can't just write about this guy doing nothing all day, every day, but he won't correspond to any situation I try to put him in; yet he keeps coming back to me through various scenes. Can you advise me at all?


Answer:

maxkirin:

Hello there, writerly friend~ ♥︎

I think that a lot of people do plotting and they go about it the wrong way. If you have taken a look at my (Strange) Guide To Planning Your Novel then you probably have a feeling for what I am about to talk about, if not— then prepare yourself.

It’s time for me to give you the best piece of advice that ever came from my many years taking creative writing classes in college. My amazing professor once said something that I have coined "The Marcy Rule" (because her name was Marcy :p and everyone needs to know that she came up with this). It goes like this:

The Marcy Rule

Story rises from character, not the other way around.

What does this mean? I find that a lot of writers are under the assumption that the plot is the primary agent in a story— and that characters are secondary. And I totally get where this misunderstanding comes from. People are taught in school that events make history. People are taught to memorize events and dates as what happened in their past. This is not good, because it forgets about the driving agent(s) behind these events.

Would you say that the most important factor in history is the events that happened (plot) or the people that lived through those days (character)?

Of course it’s the people. Story rises from character, and thus is it character that drives the story forward.

Though… I think that you already know that, writerly friend. As you said in your question— you keep trying to toss your character into plots but they don’t follow along. It’s almost as though you’re forcing events into a timeline, and you find that your lead actor is not interested in going with this script. Now, let’s look at this from the point of view of that question I get all the time:

What do I do if I have a character, but no story or plot to go with them?

You see, this is problematic, because it assumes that plot is primary— and that characters are secondary. I believe this is doing your characters an injustice. Your story does not revolve around events and dates and points on a timeline— they revolve around you, and your actions and your choices and your dreams and your goals.

Take a moment (or a few) to sit down and ask yourself this question:

  • What does this character want, and what are they willing to do to get it?

Everybody wants something. There is nothing too big or too small to write a story about. Again, people get this idea in their head that every book should be an epic story of war and death and saving the world— but I can tell you that a story about a character dealing with their own personal turmoil, and their dreams of finally overcoming their depression and being able to get up in the mornings… that can be a story as good, if not better than any ‘epic.’

So. Take this with you. Ask your characters what they want, and start following them. Don’t get in the way of the story— you are not the mastermind plotting out a plan, you are the camera-crew. Your job is to tell this character’s story. So, follow them. See where their story goes.

As a final note. Remember that everyone wants to live an ‘easy’ life, but nothing worth having ever comes easily. Every choice comes with a price, every action comes with an opposite reaction. Your character can desire to live an ‘easy’ life as much as they want… but fate always tends to get in the way of such things c;

I hope this helps! if you, or any other writerly friend has any more questions, then make sure to send them my way!

Keep writing~ ♥︎

— 2 days ago with 370 notes
"It’s not what people do to you, but what they mean, that hurts."
E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey (via larmoyante)

(via sexpansion)

— 2 days ago with 4840 notes
"Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art. It has no survival value; rather it’s one of those things that give value to survival."
C.S. Lewis (via larmoyante)

(via sexpansion)

— 2 days ago with 1869 notes
"Writing’s a lot like cooking. Sometimes the cake won’t rise, no matter what you do, and every now and again the cake tastes better than you ever could have dreamed it would."
Neil Gaiman (via maxkirin)
— 2 days ago with 739 notes
"The fear of getting hurt again has only led you to hurt yourself. Come out now. Come out while there’s still some living left to be done. This person who hurt you doesn’t deserve to still dictate your life decisions. Your discipline and dedication to structure is an illusion. You’re still powerless because you’re letting certain incidents define your life. If you really want to be in control again, you have to learn to let go again. It’s the only way."
— 2 days ago with 4289 notes

virare:

the best part about being in your 20’s is slowly caring less and less about what people think of you and surrounding yourself with good people

the worst is that I’m broke

(via cuimhnigh-i-gconai)

— 2 days ago with 62625 notes

This is how you lose her. 
You lose her when you forget to remember the little things that mean the world to her: the sincerity in a stranger’s voice during a trip to the grocery, the delight of finding something lost or forgotten like a sticker from when she was five, the selflessness of a child giving a part of his meal to another, the scent of new books in the store, the surprise short but honest notes she tucks in her journal and others you could only see if you look closely. 
You must remember when she forgets. 
You lose her when you don’t notice that she notices everything about you: your use of the proper punctuation that tells her continuation rather than finality, your silence when you’re about to ask a question but you think anything you’re about to say to her would be silly, your mindless humming when it is too quiet, your handwriting when you sign your name in blank sheets of paper, your muted laughter when you are trying to be polite, and more and more of what you are, which you don’t even know about yourself, because she pays attention. 
She remembers when you forget. 
You lose her for every second you make her feel less and less of the  beauty that she is. When you make her feel that she is replaceable. She wants to feel cherished. When you make her feel that you are fleeting. She wants you to stay. When you make her feel inadequate. She wants to know that she is enough and she does not need to change for you, nor for anyone else because she is she and she is beautiful, kind and good.
You must learn her. 
You must know the reason why she is silent. You must trace her weakest spots. You must write to her. You must remind her that you are there. You must know how long it takes for her to give up. You must be there to hold her when she is about to. 
You must love her because many have tried and failed. And she wants to know that she is worthy to be loved, that she is worthy to be kept.
And, this is how you keep her.

This is how you lose her. 

You lose her when you forget to remember the little things that mean the world to her: the sincerity in a stranger’s voice during a trip to the grocery, the delight of finding something lost or forgotten like a sticker from when she was five, the selflessness of a child giving a part of his meal to another, the scent of new books in the store, the surprise short but honest notes she tucks in her journal and others you could only see if you look closely.

You must remember when she forgets. 

You lose her when you don’t notice that she notices everything about you: your use of the proper punctuation that tells her continuation rather than finality, your silence when you’re about to ask a question but you think anything you’re about to say to her would be silly, your mindless humming when it is too quiet, your handwriting when you sign your name in blank sheets of paper, your muted laughter when you are trying to be polite, and more and more of what you are, which you don’t even know about yourself, because she pays attention.

She remembers when you forget. 

You lose her for every second you make her feel less and less of the  beauty that she is. When you make her feel that she is replaceable. She wants to feel cherished. When you make her feel that you are fleeting. She wants you to stay. When you make her feel inadequate. She wants to know that she is enough and she does not need to change for you, nor for anyone else because she is she and she is beautiful, kind and good.

You must learn her. 

You must know the reason why she is silent. You must trace her weakest spots. You must write to her. You must remind her that you are there. You must know how long it takes for her to give up. You must be there to hold her when she is about to. 

You must love her because many have tried and failed. And she wants to know that she is worthy to be loved, that she is worthy to be kept.

And, this is how you keep her.

(via sexpansion)

— 2 days ago with 539441 notes
Anonymous asked: One of the saddest and most hil- NO BITCH, the sad thing here is the fact that you're a stripper. If you want respect, maybe you should've graduated high school. 😂😂 when did stripping become a legitimate career?


Answer:

stripperina:

Awww, you tried so hard, but unfortunately I can’t hear you over the sound of my debt-free college degree and massive disposable income.

Work it and be proud girl!!!!

— 2 days ago with 147525 notes